The first photo I shot in Iceland.  I had just arrived after over 30 hours of travel, walking all over Boston for 13 hours on a layover with my backpack, and roughly 6 hours of airplane sleep over the last two days.  I had just picked up a rental car I barely knew how to drive (looking at you, manual) and had no idea where I was going to be staying that night.  As I made my way to the blue lagoon, my first and only plan, the sun started to rise over endless lava fields and I could see geothermal steam from the lagoon rising in the distance.  I then showed up way too early, was mistaken for staff, let in the back entrance, and when the mistake was realized was set up at a table with some free coffee and wifi until the lagoon officially opened.  An awestruck start.

 

The first photo I shot in Iceland.  I had just arrived after over 30 hours of travel, walking all over Boston for 13 hours on a layover with my backpack, and roughly 6 hours of airplane sleep over the last two days.  I had just picked up a rental car I barely knew how to drive (looking at you, manual) and had no idea where I was going to be staying that night.  As I made my way to the blue lagoon, my first and only plan, the sun started to rise over endless lava fields and I could see geothermal steam from the lagoon rising in the distance.  I then showed up way too early, was mistaken for staff, let in the back entrance, and when the mistake was realized was set up at a table with some free coffee and wifi until the lagoon officially opened.  An awestruck start.

After stressing during my first couple of days in Iceland about how to stream images to my website blog while there, I decided that sometimes you just need to experience your experiences and that I'd let it rest.

One trip extension and a week in Denver later, I'm home, with a huge bag of developed film.  Stay tuned.

If neurotic is wanting two mutually exclusive things at one and the same time, then I’m neurotic as hell. I’ll be flying back and forth between one mutually exclusive thing and another for the rest of my days.
— Sylvia Plath

’Fanatic,’ do they teach you it comes from the Latin for ‘temple?’ It is meaning, literally, ‘worshipper at the temple…’ Our attachments are our temple, what we worship, no? What we give ourselves to, what we invest with faith… Are we not all of us fanatics? Attachments are of great seriousness. Choose your attachments carefully. Choose your temple of fanaticism with great care… You are what you love. No? You are, completely and only, what you would die for without, as you say, the thinking twice… This, is it not the choice of the most supreme importance? Who teaches you how to choose your temple? What to love enough not to think two times?… For this choice determines all else. No? All other of our you say free choices follow from this: what is our temple.”



”But you assume it’s always choice, conscious, decision… You sit down with your little accountant’s ledger and soberly decide what to love? Always?… What if sometimes there is no choice about what to love? What if the temple comes to Mohammed? What if you just love? Without deciding? You just do… and cannot choose but to love?

— David Foster Wallace, Infinite Jest